The Blue Collar Classicist

I’d perhaps like to write to you about many things - Seven details from the letters of Vincent Van Gogh

stoneofthehapless:

Hipster Tolkien reading The Adventures of Tom Bombadil. 
I honestly don’t think I’ve ever seen this photo of him before. 

stoneofthehapless:

Hipster Tolkien reading The Adventures of Tom Bombadil

I honestly don’t think I’ve ever seen this photo of him before. 


 Imaginary Architecture (detail), François de Nomé, ca. 1600 

Imaginary Architecture (detail), François de Nomé, ca. 1600 

ancientart:

Vase dedicated by Entemena, king of Lagash, to Ningirsu.
Silver and copper, ca. 2400 BC. Found in Telloh, ancient city of Girsu.
Courtesy of & currently located at the Louvre, France, AO 2674. Photo taken by Jastrow.

ancientart:

Vase dedicated by Entemena, king of Lagash, to Ningirsu.

Silver and copper, ca. 2400 BC. Found in Telloh, ancient city of Girsu.

Courtesy of & currently located at the Louvre, France, AO 2674. Photo taken by Jastrow.

archaicwonder:

Greek Bronze Helmet, Crete, c. late 7th century BC
Two large confronting horses in repoussé decorate the sides of this bronze helmet. On each cheek guard is an incised standing lion that faces toward the opening for the warrior’s mouth. Images of strength and calm, these creatures lent symbolic protection to the warrior in battle. The horse’s mane consists of S-shaped locks with additional locks tumbling over its forehead and brow. Tracing indicates individual details of anatomy.
This helmet is a modification of a Corinthian type, having a profiled cheekpiece and lacking the usual long nose guard; originally, there was a separately attached visor. Two symmetrical halves are joined in the center by a riveted seam, along which the crest was fastened. The artist conceived the helmet in such a way that the two pieces of bronze swell in the back to give the head space, and then taper at the base to protect the neck.
Under the belly of the horse on the left side of the helmet is the dedicatory inscription “Synenitos the son of Euklotas [took this],” suggesting that the armor was captured as booty and offered as a dedication. Armor made in Crete during this period was often decorated with elaborate repoussé work, which might explain why they were often dedicated at Greek sanctuaries.

archaicwonder:

Greek Bronze Helmet, Crete, c. late 7th century BC

Two large confronting horses in repoussé decorate the sides of this bronze helmet. On each cheek guard is an incised standing lion that faces toward the opening for the warrior’s mouth. Images of strength and calm, these creatures lent symbolic protection to the warrior in battle. The horse’s mane consists of S-shaped locks with additional locks tumbling over its forehead and brow. Tracing indicates individual details of anatomy.

This helmet is a modification of a Corinthian type, having a profiled cheekpiece and lacking the usual long nose guard; originally, there was a separately attached visor. Two symmetrical halves are joined in the center by a riveted seam, along which the crest was fastened. The artist conceived the helmet in such a way that the two pieces of bronze swell in the back to give the head space, and then taper at the base to protect the neck.

Under the belly of the horse on the left side of the helmet is the dedicatory inscription “Synenitos the son of Euklotas [took this],” suggesting that the armor was captured as booty and offered as a dedication. Armor made in Crete during this period was often decorated with elaborate repoussé work, which might explain why they were often dedicated at Greek sanctuaries.

monsieurleprince:

Edmund Blair Leighton (1853 - 1922) - God speed, 1900

monsieurleprince:

Edmund Blair Leighton (1853 - 1922) - God speed, 1900

scrapironflotilla:

French soldiers wearing First World War-era uniforms parade on the Champs Elysees during the annual Bastille Day military parade in Paris, on July 14. 
As the vast majority of WW1 era photos we see are black and white, it’s often hard to imagine how they should look. Every so often it’s good to have a reminder that the War, and all of pre-colour history, looked as vibrant and real as life today.

scrapironflotilla:

French soldiers wearing First World War-era uniforms parade on the Champs Elysees during the annual Bastille Day military parade in Paris, on July 14. 

As the vast majority of WW1 era photos we see are black and white, it’s often hard to imagine how they should look. Every so often it’s good to have a reminder that the War, and all of pre-colour history, looked as vibrant and real as life today.

likeafieldmouse:

Rembrandt van Rijn - The Three Trees (1643)

statues-and-monuments:

statues-and-monuments
Paris Opera House by Michael Maniezzo 
Paris, France

ART HISTORY MEME || [6/6] themes or series or subjects: Sea/ocean

lobsterwarrior:

Age of Sail (sailing ships of Royal Navy)

fayettish:

The Battle of Camperdown, Philipp James de Loutherbourg, 1799. Detail.

fayettish:

The Battle of CamperdownPhilipp James de Loutherbourg, 1799. Detail.

juliangriffith:

Types and Riga of Tall Ships

juliangriffith:

Types and Riga of Tall Ships

russian-style:

Natalia Goncharova - Illustration to the Tale of Tsar Saltan by Alexander Pushkin, 1921.